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Yaruro

OTHER NAMES

Yaruru, Pume

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Our people, also called Yaruro-Pume, along with the Sáliba, Piapoco, Achagua, or Otomacos, are considered one of the most essential and immediate ancestors of what is now known as the Llanera ethnic group. A group of especially importance in Venezuela, as we come from the interactions with and submission from colonists to learn their ways of life.

Since ancient times, our people has had exchanges with some of the other communities now living in the Caño Mochuelo Reserve. According to some researchers, the Yaruros called all the indigenous peoples of the Guahibo family Chiricoa. * Like many of them, we have adopted nomadic practices that allowed us to survive the colonization of our territory. Upon our arrival to the reserve, we settled in the community of El Calvario where we lived with the Yamalero people, and even though our communities have been divided, we still maintain strong kinship ties with them. The Yaruro people now include 95 individuals from 23 families.

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* Romero Moreno, M. E., Castro Agudelo, L. M., y Muriel Bejarano, A. Geografía humana de Colombia. Región Orinoquia, vol. 1, tomo III (Bogotá: Instituto Colombiano de Cultura Hispánica, 1993): 88, 92, 124.

95

POPULATION

population

23

families

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Yaruro people

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Yaruro ecological calendar - Calvary Unuma

Click to enlarge